Monday, May 30, 2016

The Twisting Noose
Joan Swirsky
May 30, 2016

When I think about the slow and inexorable––but, of course, inevitable––political demise of Hillary Clinton, I am reminded of T.S. Eliot’s poem, “The Hollow Men,” which ends with this haunting refrain:
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.
Hillary’s whimper, it seems clear, will come with an impotently furious last gasp, as the noose that Barack Obama has placed around her neck tightens and tightens and tightens until all we hear is her spasmodic cough, a few hoarse protestations, and a final pitiful bleat––and not the ear-splitting assault of “that voice,” which I  described in a previous article.
How could this happen to the woman who former Democrat House Ways and Means Committee Chairman and convicted felon Dan Rostenkowski called “the smartest woman in the world”?
No doubt it started at Wellesley College where Hillary, born to a family of Republicans and an avid supporter herself of the1964 arch-conservative presidential candidate Barry Goldwater, as well as the president of the Wellesley College chapter of College Republicans, was irresistibly attracted to the writings of radical leftist Saul Alinsky, of Rules for Radicals fame, who she wrote her thesis about and also kept in close touch with for years after she graduated.
At her graduation in 1969, Republican Senator Edward Brooke delivered a stirring and enthusiastically received commencement address. Hillary––whose graduation speech followed––exhibited a shocking display of rudeness when she slammed the first black senator to be elected to the U.S. Senate. It would not be the last time she displayed a remarkable aptitude for alienating an audience.
At Yale Law School, she hooked her wagon to the star of fellow student Bill Clinton, and when the roguish good ole boy became governor of Arkansas, Hillary served 12 years as the state’s First Lady, racking up an impressive list of scandals of her very own. The short list includes:
  • $100,000 windfall from cattle futures after a $1,000 investment (all the money she had in her account at the time).
  • The Castle Grande real estate scam.
  • Her role as attorney for the Rose law firm in what would become the putatively criminal Whitewater affair that would follow her to the White House.
  • The serial philandering of her husband in which she was either a willing collaborator or, as Donald Trump has said, an “enabler.”


Within months of taking up residence in the White House as First Lady of the United States, Hillary put her scandal expertise to work. In May 1993, she was accused of having a central hand in firing several long-time employees of the White House Travel Office in order to give the pricey travel business to her Hollywood pals. A couple of months later, in July 1993, White House Deputy Counsel Vince Foster was said to have committed suicide, although the case for  this murder has been made persuasively by, among others, founder Christopher Ruddy, in his 1993 book, “The Strange Death of Vincent Foster: An Investigation.”
But the case didn’t end there. In 1996, Hillary was accused by the Senate Special Whitewater Committee of ordering the removal of potentially damaging files related to Whitewater from Foster’s office on the night of his death. Hillary denied everything, once again proving her adeptness in dodging accountability. But even today, Cliff Kincaid, in a must-read article, writes that Something Stinks: The “Fishy” Vince Foster Case.  “Trump, if elected president, could order a new investigation,” Kincaid says. “Such a probe might show media complicity in the cover-up…”
During those years, Hillary vacillated between corruption and incompetence. When her devoted husband put her in charge of healthcare reform, she blew $13 million but couldn’t even get a Democrat Congress to pass the hated bill, in spite of the usual threats and intimidation.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.